Reviews

  • The Centaur's Promise

    From Amazon.com

    4.0 out of 5 stars The Cerntaur's Promise, September 26, 2011
    By A Jungman

    This delightful book, about horses, mythology, relationships in a setting that made me keep reading until I finished the book. The author did an excellent job of moving the story from one setting and person to another and a great ending. A must read for those who love horses and care how animals are treated.

    5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting!, September 16, 2011
    By suzanne hartley

    I just finished The Centaur's Promise. It is exciting from beginning to end. The story takes many twists and turns, leaving the reader wondering where the story is headed, next. Readers learn a bit of Greek mythology, learn some of the mysteries of wild and tame horses and their devotees, plus the inhumane treatment of our wild horses. Suitable for all ages!

    4.0 out of 5 stars A fun read!, May 4, 2010
    By Marjorie E. Palmer (Augusta, GA USA)

    A fun read! The Centaur's Promise covers several subjects with equal interest. Cynthia, the protagonist, is lost in her personal and professional life, but as she lives an unexpected journey she discovers who she is and what her future must be. In the process the reader becomes aware of the fate of our American mustangs, which is a very real concern today. Thanks to Ms. Cole for this offering. She is a wonderful story teller! I look forward to reading more from her.

  • The Salvationist

    from DWD's Reviews

    A Clever Twist on the Typical Western
    Reviewed on July 13, 2012

    This short story is a clever twist on the typical western story. Many westerns have the theme of the banker, or other powerful businessman exploiting the townspeople for his own nefarious purposes only to have the local drifter come in and confront him and eventually save the day.

    Nancy Cole Silverman has a similar situation with the most powerful man in Bisbee, Arizona, a mining boom town, exploiting the local miners and young women by gobbling up their claims (in the case of the miners) or coercing them into becoming prostitutes in his brothel (in the case of the young women). The hero is not a cowboy or a gunfighter. Instead, she is a bumbling, well-intentioned and brave rookie evangelist (Salvationist) named Fannie Johnston who has come to town with the Salvation Army as part of a team sent to evangelize to this rowdy boom town.

    Loosely based on events in the life of the author's great-great grandmother, the story is often amusing and, even though it ends abruptly, it is still a solid western story and perhaps a bit more close to the truth than the more popular gunslinger stories.

    Emily Durante does a nice job of voicing the great variety of characters (newspapermen, Salvation Army members, miners, young people, the sheriff and several more). Nicely done.

    I rate this audiobook 4 stars out of 5.